Leather Care

Leather

Leather Care

To keep your leather looking beautiful for a long time to come please follow these instructions:

PIGMENTED, SEMI – ANILINE LEATHERS

Leather should be cleaned often. Frequent and gentle cleaning is easier on leather versus less frequent, more aggressive cleaning. Cleaning will remove dust, dirt, and perspiration. We recommend that you first wipe off any dust, paying special attention to those areas where particles will collect, such as the area between the seat and the cushions.

Clean pigmented and semi-aniline leather with a mild soap and water solution (a mild soap will have a neutral pH so it is not harsh on your skin and therefore not harsh on the leather). For general cleaning, use a weak solution of soap; 3 – 4 drops of soap per liter of water. Use a slightly higher concentration to remove more excessive dirt. Always wipe off any residual soap solution from the leather with a clean, damp cloth. It is important that you do not saturate the leather. Always test the soap solution in an unseen area of the sofa to ensure the solution does not damage the leather.

Conditioning is not necessary. Cleaning to remove skin oils is the best prevention to any deterioration of the leather. The use of any conditioners or treatments on your furniture will void the manufacturer’s warranty.

COVER CARE – NATURAL AND FULL ANILINE

Leather should be cleaned often. Frequent and gentle cleaning is easier on leather versus less frequent, more aggressive cleaning. Cleaning will remove dust, dirt, and perspiration. We recommend that you first vacuum off any dust, paying special attention to those areas where particles will collect, such as the area between the seat and the cushions.

Clean aniline leathers only using a slightly damp cloth and then immediately wipe with a dry cloth. Do not use any type of soap on aniline leathers. It is important that you do not saturate the leather.

Conditioning is not necessary. Cleaning to remove skin oils is best prevention to any deterioration of the leather. The use of any conditioners or treatments on your furniture will void the manufacturer’s warranty.

Some other important things to keep in mind:

  • Special attention should be given when cleaning the areas where there is more skin contact with the leather
  • Hair products and skin oils will chemically attack the finish on the leather.
  • Exposure to sun and/or extreme light sources will cause fading and potential damage.
  • Dark jeans and other clothing have a high risk of dye transfer onto the leather, especially when the leather is lighter in color.
  • Sharp objects will easily puncture and cut into leather.

When selecting leathers:

What is important to you?  Things to consider:

Protected:

Measures how much surface protection the leather possesses. Surface protection can be a form of: teflon coating, wax, or additional pigments in the dye process. Typically, the more coating you put on the leather, the less natural the feel will be. A higher level of coating will afford you a greater degree of stain resistance.

Softness:

Measures how soft and supple the leather is to the touch. Softness is achieved through hours of milling in drums, a thinner cut of leather, or less pigments and top coating on the product.

Lightfastness:

Measures how susceptible the leather is to fading when exposed to sunlight. As we know, in time enough direct sunlight can and will fade anything.

Cleanability:

Measures how well the leather reacts to a food or drink accident, based on the amount of time allowed to clean the affected area. The Cleanability rating will help determine which leathers are more suited for heavy use with an active family. Darker leathers are easier to clean than a bone or linen color. Periodic overall cleaning is recommended to maintain the beauty of all leather.

Natural Markings:

Measures the degree of natural markings found on the finished leather hide. Natural markings consist of a variety of scars, insect bites, stretch marks and neck wrinkles all acquired in the animal’s habitat. The origin of the leather assists in determining how many scars are on the hide. Corrected grain leather will have no natural markings since it has been altered or sanded to make it more acceptable for use. A corrected grain will reduce the softness and natural feel of a full grain leather hide. Full top grain leather has not been altered or sanded. Most leather found today is corrected grain due to price and availability. The fewer scars, the more costly the leather.

 

Leather Types

Pure Aniline:

Leather that is aniline dyed and receives no additional coloring. Also called full aniline, naked aniline or naked leather.

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Semi-Aniline: (most common)

A semi-aniline leather has been aniline dyed, then slightly pigmented. Because pigment is solid, this type of leather ensures color consistency while having stain and spill resistance.

Full Grain/ Natural Leather:

The term used for the outside original skin or hide which has had the hair removed, but otherwise has not been corrected or altered. Full grain leather possesses the genuine original grain of the animal.

Or

Embossed Leather:

Usually corrected grain, in which a pattern is applied by extreme pressure in a press to give a unique design or imitation of full grain characteristics.

Sometimes leathers are embossed to make them appear to be another leather, such as embossing an alligator pattern into a cowhide.

Another example is Basket-weave embossed leathers that create a three-dimensional, basket-weave texture on the hide.

Top Grain:

The term intended to define genuine grain leather, as opposed to split leather

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Split:

The middle or bottom layer of the hide. Split leathers are sometimes used in areas that are not under any stress, as backs or sides of sofa. Embossed to create a very uniform grain pattern.

Treated/ Specialty Leathers:

Hand Antiqued:

During the finishing process, each hide is carefully hand-antiqued to produce an aged, distressed appearance. Hand antiquing results in color and tone variations which will become apparent on the final product. Natural markings such as healed scars, insect bites, grain variations and fat wrinkles are often enhanced by the antiquing process and will vary from piece to piece.

Pull Up and Waxed:

A “Pull Up” leather lightens dramatically when pulled over firm areas of an upholstery frame. This characteristic is referred to as “burst”, and occurs when the oils and waxes used in the tanning process migrate away from the stressed areas. Non-stressed areas, such as cushions, will remain darker. The burst pattern may be random, as different areas of the hide may have more burst than others. Healed scars and other natural markings may become more visible in lightened areas.

Protected Leather:

Leather in which certain special chemicals have been incorporated to render it less liable to deterioration through exposure to polluted atmospheres.